Open House Festival

Neighbourhoods

Back to neighbourhoods

Brentford

From the newly-refurbished Boston Manor House – the fine Jacobean manor house built in 1623, situated in Boston Manor Park with lake and ancient cedar trees, to the heart of industrial Victorian London (Brentford Canal Toll House and Gauging Lock), Brentford has lots to offer. It’s home to the Butts Conservation Area, with beautifully proportioned 18th century houses including St. Mary’s Convent, and its name hinting at a history dating back even further to when Henry VIII commandeered the land for archery practice in the 16th century. Hear about the local history from passionate locals (Brentford Then and Now/Brentford through the Ages) and visit the 1785 Brentford & Isleworth Quaker Meeting House on Quaker’s Lane.

It’s home to the Butts Conservation Area, with beautifully proportioned wide streets of 18th century houses including St. Mary’s Convent, and its name hinting at a history dating back even further to the 16th century, when Henry VIII commandeered land north of the High Street for archery practice.

Hear about the local history from passionate locals (Brentford Then and Now/Brentford through the Ages) and visit the 1785 Brentford & Isleworth Quaker Meeting House on Quaker’s Lane. From there you can head back to the River Thames and Isleworth, with its own group of Open House venues and unique stories.

From Boston Manor House to Quaker’s Lane is a 25 minute walk.

Guided tour

Boston Manor House

historical house

Boston Manor House is a Jacobean House built for Lady Mary Reade in 1623 and later owned by the Clitherow family from the 1670s until the 1920s. The House is now open to the public with free entry six days a week. Its beautifully restored historic interiors, including breath-taking original ornate plasterwork, are joined by two community exhibition galleries, meeting rooms and an attractive modern café

Drop in

Brentford Canal Toll House and Gauging Lock

infrastructure/engineering

Single-storey canal toll house (1911) where tolls were collected for passing through the lock. Grand Junction Canal connected the Thames at Brentford to the Industrial Midlands in 1794 at the height of the industrial revolution.

Unknown, 1911

The walk starts in the Medieval market place, proceeds through 17C development and 18C housing then explores 19/20C industrial legacy and striking new 21C Thames-side regeneration schemes.

Assael Architecture, 2018

Drop in / Talk / Workshop

Quaker Meeting House - Brentford & Isleworth

religious, cemetery, community/cultural, garden, historical house, library, mixed use

The B&I Meeting House is a Grade II* listed late-Georgian Quaker Meeting House (1785), surrounded by peaceful and green gardens and a Quaker burial ground. Still in active use today, the architecture includes unique examples of old Quaker practices no longer found in more modern Meetings. Consistent renovations and updates have added new rooms, accessible ramps and toilets, and a full kitchen.

Unknown, 1785

Guided tour

St Mary's Convent

religious

Convent in 18C Grade II listed house, c1764-1792, with original features including fine decorative plasterwork. Various additions including west wing (1913-15), and harmonious care home facilities and chapel by PRP Architects (1998-2001). Apologies to visitors turned away last year. Please book for this year.

Unknown, 1764